Growing Small Amounts Of Cannabis At Home Not Illegal, Italy's Supreme Court Rules

The landmark decision has reignited a debate in the country about the use and legalization of marijuana.

Growing Small Amounts Of Cannabis At Home Not Illegal, Italy's Supreme Court Rules

The landmark decision has reignited a debate in the country about the use and legalization of marijuana.

ROME (Reuters) ― Italy’s Supreme Court has ruled that small-scale domestic cultivation of cannabis is legal, in a landmark decision triggering calls for further legalization from weed advocates and anger from the country’s conservatives.

Called on to clarify previous conflicting interpretations of the law, the Court of Cassation decreed that the crime of growing narcotic drugs should exclude “small amounts grown domestically for the exclusive use of the grower”.

The ruling was made on Dec. 19, but went unnoticed until Thursday, when it was reported by domestic news agencies and immediately fueled a simmering political debate over cannabis use in Italy.

“The court has opened the way, now it’s up to us,” said Matteo Mantero, a senator from the co-ruling 5-Star Movement.

Mantero presented an amendment to the 2020 budget calling for legalization and regulation of domestic cannabis use, but it was ruled inadmissible by the senate speaker from Silvio Berlusconi’s conservative Forza Italia party.

“Drugs cause harm, forget about growing them or buying them in shops,” Matteo Salvini, leader of the right-wing League Party said in a statement on Friday, in reference to shops selling low-strength “legal weed” that are widespread in Italy.