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AFRO RESUMES
writing (1K)Useless Resume Objectives

Copyright 2000-2003 by Rita Fisher, CPRW,
http://www.CareerChangeResumes.com


What's wrong with an objective on a resume? The problem with objectives on resumes is that a typical objective is self-centered and self-serving; therefore, it is useless. Instead of an objective, use a power statement.

Let me illustrate what I mean by giving examples of both objectives and power statements. Here is a typical objective, one that HR personnel see on top of resumes all the time:

"Customer Service Representative position allowing me to fully utilize my skills and attributes and providing professional advancement opportunities."

What did this objective tell me? The above objective communicated to me basically nothing but for the sake of this case study here are a few points:

A. The person is looking for a Customer Service position. (No problem with that.)

B. The individual's priority seems to be his/her professional advancement within the organization. (Oops, that's not the way to treat a potential employer. That's not what the company wants to hear. They want to hear how you will BENEFIT THEM, not yourself.)

C. The candidate didn't specify skills and attributes thus didn't give any glimpse into what he/she can do for the company. (Not good because employers want specifics.)

D. Self-oriented instead of employer oriented. (Not good at all.)

Let's translate the same objective into a power statement.

"Award-winning highly accomplished and motivated Customer Service professional with proven track record of rapport-building, resourceful problem-solving and communication skills."

What did this tell me? The power statement communicated to me that:

A. The person is a competent, distinguished (award-winning) Customer Service professional who has excellent working knowledge of his/her trade. (Good.)

B. Has a proven track record of relevant attributes. (Good.)

C. The reader can get a glimpse into how the person could benefit the company as a result of mentioning specific skills and abilities that are necessary to do that particular job well. (Very good.)

D. The power statement is employer-oriented, not focused on self.

Remember, when employers look at your resume, they read it with one thought and one thought only in mind: What Can This Person Do for Us? If you include a self-oriented objective, instead of an employer-oriented power statement at the top of your resume, you will turn off the potential employer before they even get a chance to read your entire resume.

The main difference between the objective and the power statement is that while the objective is self-serving and self-focused, the power statement is employee-oriented and results-focused.

Employers only care about results - the results you will produce for them on the job whether it will be saving money, solving a problem or increasing profitability. If you can hint within your power statement in a short and compelling way how you will benefit the company, you are on your way to your interview. Go get them!

Looking for a new career but don't know how to present your skills for the new job? Then you need a career change resume by an award-winning Certified Professional Resume Writer. Rita's service, Career Change Resumes, was profiled in a book on the Oprah show. Rita's resumes guarantee you interviews or 100% of your money back.

Follow this link to Career Change Resumes




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